Media-Lite Living Initiative at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – Alumnus Testimonial

In September 2014, parents at the Waldorf School of Atlanta began a Media-Lite Living initiative.  The WSA Family Handbook holds recommendations about limiting media.  This initiative is designed to support parents on this road.  We are archiving the articles, stories and testimonials from this initiative on the WSA blog.  An Introduction article that includes links to articles in this series is here.

Alumnus Testimonial:

I never realized how lucky I was to have had a media-free childhood until a couple of years ago. When I graduated 8th grade at WSA in 2008, a media-free/media-light way of life was all I had ever known. I had taken for granted the opportunities for creativity and independent thought Waldorf provided me with until I entered public high school, a world full of media and lost innocence, with less emphasis on creativity. Growing up without the intruding, often negative, influence of movies and TV shows opened new worlds of adventure for me. I was allowed to draw, play, sing, and dream as I liked, never held down by the perimeter of a screen or the limits of a computer program. Now, times have changed and media permeates every aspect of modern life. However I still do, and always will, hold close to my heart my memories of a free childhood, full of imagination and happiness, spontaneity and adventure, exploration and creation; all this thanks to the Waldorf philosophy.

E H, WSA Class of 2008

Currently a junior at the College of William & Mary

 

The above article was taken from The Garden Breeze, our WSA in-house newsletter.  For more information about our school, please visit us at the Waldorf School of Atlanta.

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Waldorf School of Atlanta – student artwork

 

Media-Lite Living Initiative at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – article

In September 2014, parents at the Waldorf School of Atlanta began a Media-Lite Living initiative.  The WSA Family Handbook holds recommendations about limiting media.  This initiative is designed to support parents on this road.  We are archiving the articles, stories and testimonials from this initiative on the WSA blog.  Introduction article is here.    The Second Article is here.  The Third Article is here. The Fourth Article is here.

Media-Lite Living
 
Upcoming Parent Workshop: Living Media Lite Throughout the Holidays
Monday, December 1, 8:30-10:00am, Hospitality Room
This informative, conversational-based workshop for WSA parents and friends will offer practical suggestions for confronting common holiday challenges such as:
  • media and extended family – at their house and at yours
  • living media lite while traveling
  • alternatives to media during holiday family time 
  • gift giving alternatives
  • conversations with extended family about living media lite 
  • and more!
 
Interested but cannot attend this date and time?  Still email and let us know!
 
Offerings: Research Article: The Impact of Technology on the Developing Child
 

Reminiscing about the good old days when we were growing up is a memory trip well worth taking when trying to understand the issues facing the children of today. A mere 20 years ago, children used to play outside all day, riding bikes, playing sports and building forts. Masters of imaginary games, children of the past created their own form of play that didn’t require costly equipment or parental supervision. Children of the past moved… a lot, and their sensory world was nature based and simple. In the past, family time was often spent doing chores, and children had expectations to meet on a daily basis. The dining room table was a central place where families came together to eat and talk about their day, and after dinner became the center for baking, crafts and homework.

Today’s families are different. Technology’s impact on the 21st century family is fracturing its very foundation, and causing a disintegration of core values that long ago were the fabric that held families together……open the following link for the full article:

The above article was taken from The Garden Breeze, our WSA in-house newsletter.  For more information about our school, please visit us at Waldorf School of Atlanta.

Advent at the Waldorf School of Atlanta

Advent at the Waldorf School of Atlanta

Media-Lite Living Initiative at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – another parent testimonial

In September 2014, parents at the Waldorf School of Atlanta began a Media-Lite Living initiative.  The WSA Family Handbook holds recommendations about limiting media.  This initiative is designed to support parents on this road.  We are archiving the articles, stories and testimonials from this initiative on the WSA blog.  Introduction article is here.    The Second Article is here.  The Third Article is here.

 Media-Lite Living

Offerings: Parent Testimonial

When our daughter began kindergarten at WSA in 1996, we were already on board with restricting media. A few months into the school year, however, her teacher encouraged us to eliminate television entirely. We were amazed at the difference it made. It seemed to allow E~~ to be herself — almost as if a weight was lifted from her. She was more joyful and would happily go around singing to herself. We continued in this vein, mostly, for several years. When we took her to a G-rated movie at age 5, she was terrified. That inspired us to keep her shielded from the sarcasm and meanness found in many Hollywood films.

By third or fourth grade, the children were more vocal about wanting to watch TV. E~~’s teacher had a policy about not watching television on a day when they had been in school or would be in school the next day. That left Saturdays as the only possible day to watch TV. I really appreciated this “rule” being established for the class as a whole because it made it easier to say “no.” The rare Saturday evening when we watched something together was truly special.

After WSA, E~~ attended a public high school. As she neared graduation, she would comment on how glad she was that she was able to enjoy her childhood at Waldorf. Her high school classmates were exposed to things in elementary and middle school that E~~ didn’t have to deal with until ninth grade. Although her public school classmates were sure she hadn’t learned anything at Waldorf because she was having way too much fun, she graduated at the top of her class, so apparently she learned a few things along the way!

~Mother of WSA alumna, class of 2008

   The above article was taken from The Garden Breeze, our WSA in-house newsletter.  For more information about our school, please visit us at Waldorf School of Atlanta.

 

Childhood First.

Media-Lite Living Initiative at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – screen free restaurants

In September 2014, parents at the Waldorf School of Atlanta began a Media-Lite Living initiative.  The WSA Family Handbook holds recommendations about limiting media.  This initiative is designed to support parents on this road.  We are archiving the articles, stories and testimonials from this initiative on the WSA blog.  Introduction article is here.    The Second Article is here.

Media-Lite Living

Updates:  WSA parents have continued to meet and exchange stories and support for struggles and successes with living a media-lite lifestyle.  The next scheduled gathering will focus on exchanging concrete ideas and successful stories for creating alternatives to media at home and in the community.  This meeting will be held:

Friday, November 14, 8:30 to 10am, Hospitality Room

Who are the resources for this exchange?  You – fellow WSA Parents! If you have a story or idea about living with alternatives to media, please come to this meet-up.  Can’t come but have ideas and stories to share?   Send them to us!

Offerings: Screen Free Restaurants

Have you ever gone to a restaurant with your family in hopes of enjoying warm conversation over a delicious meal only to be thwarted by the large and loud television screen above your table?  Listed below are the names of some local restaurants that do not have televisions in their dining areas, to help you avoid this frustration and try again!

Community BBQ – Decatur, on Clairmont Avenue near Athens Pizza
Radial Café – Atlanta, Dekalb Avenue
Flying Biscuit – Candler Park
Farm Burger – Decatur
Ammazza – Atlanta, Edgewood Avenue
Good Karma Coffee Shop – Avondale Estates
Cakes and Ale Bakery – Decatur
Chai Pani – Decatur
Java Jive – Virginia Highlands
Homegrown – Atlanta, Memorial Drive
Octane – Atlanta, Marietta Street
Ria’s Bluebird- Grant Park
Matthew’s Cafeteria – Tucker
Pancake House – Memorial Drive, Clarkston

If you visit one of these or any other restaurants without screens, be sure to let the manager know that you appreciate eating your meal without the added distraction of a television screen.  If the screen status has changed, or you know of other restaurants without screens, let us know!  Happy dining!

  The above article was taken from The Garden Breeze, our WSA in-house newsletter.  For more information about our school, please visit us at Waldorf School of Atlanta

Kindergarten Classroom at the Waldorf School of Atlanta

Kindergarten Classroom at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – Soup Day

Media-Lite Living Initiative at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – parent testimonial

In September 2014, parents at the Waldorf School of Atlanta began a Media-Lite Living initiative.  The WSA Family Handbook holds recommendations about limiting media.  This initiative is designed to support parents on this road.  We are archiving the articles, stories and testimonials from this initiative on the WSA blog.  Introduction article is here.

 Media-Lite Living

1. Updates

Several introductory meetings for the Parent Initiative for Media-Lite Living have been held recently. The atmosphere is open and comfortable; many thought-provoking conversations have ensued about media-lite living.

2a. Offerings: Research

Please use the following link for the Steve Jobs article on being a low tech parent, in case the recently printed article was hard to open.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/11/fashion/steve-jobs-apple-was-a-low-tech-parent.html

2b. Offerings: Parent Testimonial

Part of what attracted me to Waldorf for my girls (now 13 and 16) was the media-lite policy. I wanted my girls to be able to fully grow into their best selves, and it seemed like the way for them to do that was to do “real” things, not sit in front of the TV. I wanted them to play with friends that came over so that they would learn good social skills and also have the benefit of real play. We have by no means been a media-free family, but we did have two rules: no media on play dates, and no TV Monday through Thursday.

With the media flooding the general culture, it has been difficult to stand my ground on this issue! It has been very helpful to have the support of other parents at Waldorf. It also helped that the kids were with peers that had similar rules at home. I’m grateful that the Waldorf community helped my husband and me to limit media exposure. It has helped us to teach our own values to our kids, rather than having them bombarded by whatever the television show creators chose to say.

~WSA 8th grade parent

   The above article was taken from The Garden Breeze, our WSA in-house newsletter.  For more information about our school, please visit us at Waldorf School of Atlanta

Grade Seven chalkboard August

Waldorf School of Atlanta grade 7 classroom chalkboard drawing

Media-Lite Living Initiative at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – introduction

In September 2014, parents at the Waldorf School of Atlanta began a Media-Lite Living initiative.  The WSA Family Handbook holds recommendations about limiting media.  This initiative is designed to support parents on this road.  We are archiving the articles, stories and testimonials from this initiative on the WSA blog.  Articles:   2,  3,  4,  5,  6, 7, , 9, 10

Initiative Introduction:

The intention of having a forum for Media-Lite Living is that we seek to give a voice and active presence of support and collaboration with fellow parents and their efforts in creating and living a media-lite lifestyle with their families.

We seek to be:

  1.     Resourceful: By sharing information on the impact of media upon children’s development, we offer clarity and insight into why seeking a media-lite lifestyle is a desired goal.

2.     Encouraging: By offering encouragement, we offer fellow parents a sense of courage for creating a media-lite lifestyle at home: “information is good, but encouragement is everything”.

 3.     Inspiring: By sharing real stories of how our children have thrived at home by engaging in real play, creative endeavors, and purposeful work experiences, instead of media, we hope to kindle other parents’ visions of what is possible for their own children within their own homes.

Lastly, we seek to support the school’s vision of protecting childhood and the sacred work that our children are involved in: growing and learning at their own pace while fully engaging in life. We celebrate all of our children within the school community, and all the possibilities for life they exquisitely hold within themselves and daily express at school and at home.  By celebrating our children we celebrate, honor, and contribute to the unique community we have here at WSA.

Interested? Curious? Questions?

 Invite to First Meeting:

The first meeting of the WSA Parent Initiative for Media-Lite Living will be held this Monday morning, September 29, from 8:30 to 10:00.  Look for us in the Hospitality Room.

1. All WSA parents and interested friends are warmly invited to attend.  Time is short?  Stop in to introduce yourself!  Have half and hour? Then come!  Can stay for entire time?  Terrific! Have a young child?  They are welcome!!!  Can’t make it this time?  Look in upcoming editions of the Breeze Bulletin for information on future meeting

Bring your curiosity, questions, comments, and sense of camaraderie as we explore and share this journey of Media-Lite Living.  Already living it?  Come to offer support, encouragement, and insight of the journey to other fellow parents.

2. The following recently published New York Times article about Apple’s founder, Steve Jobs, being a low-tech parent, may be of interest to you.  The link is the following:  http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/11/fashion/steve-jobs-apple-was-a-low-tech-parent.html

 The above articles were taken from The Garden Breeze, our WSA in-house newsletter.  For more information about our school, please visit us at Waldorf School of Atlanta

Waldorf School of Atlanta - front sign

Handwork at the Waldorf School of Atlanta – Grade 1

 

The Handwork Curriculum at the Waldorf School of Atlanta is led by Lisa Roggow.    Her loving care of the children is evident in these letters to parents of each grade.  

grade 1 knitted chick

Dear Grade One Parents:

In all likelihood we will begin having first grade handwork class next week.  Before we begin I would like to give you a preview of the work which we will be doing.

A great deal of the first grade curriculum, in every class, has to do with working in a circle – both literally and metaphorically.   While we generally stay seated in Handwork class, we do reinforce that circular gesture.    One of the most important ways we do this is to work together, at a similar pace.   It is very important that the children’s early exposure to handwork be in a non-competitive, supportive environment.   Ultimately, our goal is to nurture a sense of confidence and capability in the children.   This unfolds most naturally when the process is non-stressful and reverential.

Therefore, the early part of our year will be spent reinforcing skills they may have learned in kindergarten, specifically making twisted ropes and finger chaining.   Not only are these activities fun, but they also wake up the fingers and strengthen fine motor skills.  Also, in the case of twisted ropes, they require team work, which is an excellent activity to help form relationships in a new class.  Next we will take a closer look the medium we will be using for the next two years and play with raw wool.  We will hear about where it comes from and how it is turned into yarn.  We will make bits of yarn and poof it up into clouds.  All these activities are a fun way to heighten the children’s tactile sense and get them accustomed to the materials.

When the children are all ready we will move on to making our knitting needles.   We do this by taking a pair of dowels and sanding vigorously with two or three different grades of sandpaper, until they feel as smooth as glass.  Then we rub beeswax onto the needles to condition them, and finally we rub and rub with a soft piece of felt in order to polish the wax in and clean the surface off.    By the time the needles are done the children will be ready to have the eighth graders come and teach them to knit.   They will be a more experienced class, with knowledge of  many of the skills important in first grade, such as knowing when to leave your seat and when to stay in it, when to raise your hand and when to ask for help.   And so they will hear our knitting story…

I will them about a little shepherd who has ten sheep to watch over.   As the story progresses, the sheep all disappear one by one.  The shepherd goes on a journey to find the sheep, and discovers them behind a fence in a pasture.   She calls to them, but they cannot come past the fence.   So the little shepherd goes “under the fence, catches a sheep, brings it through, and off it leaps”.   This is our knitting verse, and it gives a name to each step in knitting a stitch.  As the children become more experienced knitters we can diagnose problems with the language this verse provides – for instance I may tell a child who has wrapped his yarn around the needle twice that he caught an extra sheep.  The children who know the verse immediately know what happened and are able to correct the problem the next time.

Before the eighth graders arrive, the children will choose their color and my assistant, Ms. Bulmer and I will cast on  ten “sheep” and knit a few rows for everyone so that the children have something to hold on to when they begin knitting.   The older students are already looking forward to working with the first grade during these two magical class periods.

After that visit we will work for a few weeks on finishing up a small piece about the size of an adult hand.  To promote that feeling of working together, Ms. Bulmer and I will try to ensure that we are all working at about the same pace, checking all the work before class, fixing the many little mistakes that crop up and keeping the work at about the same level of completion.   These first little pieces will be sewn together and turned into bean bags for the classroom.   As adults, we are often very aware of small errors in our work, which can be discouraging.   Some children, when they are first learning, will often joyously gloss right over such things, caught up in the wonder of their new skill.   Turning this first work into bean bags not only gives us an opportunity to work in a circle by making something for the group, but it also gives the handwork teachers the flexibility to turn these first pieces into something that the children will see are of real use in their world.

With this first bit of knitting under our belts, we begin knitting in earnest, and you will most likely see three projects coming home after midyear.  Their needles will come home at the end of the year and we will use school needles in second grade.  With each project we do through the end of second grade we will add another skill to the student’s knitting repertoire and continue to reinforce old skills.

I am looking forward to getting to know your children.  Should you have any questions about  our work together, feel free to drop by the handwork room or email me.

Lisa Roggow, Handwork Teacher

grade 1 -knitting needles and cat

AUTUMN MIDDLE SCHOOL MAIN LESSONS at the Waldorf School of Atlanta

Adolescence is an expansive age. Throughout the autumn middle school students have been asked to extend themselves both in the variety and the depth of their studies. The approach of the holiday break is a time for culminating all the efforts made over the previous months, and the main lessons reflect that.

drawing in ml book

The sixth grade, for example, has just finished a writing block with a special focus on dialogue and style. One way of developing your own style is by experiencing someone else’s. Each student set the stage for a scene, drawn from history or other familiar subjects. The composition was then collected and typed up without naming the author. This was passed on to a second student who developed the rising tension. Following that, it was passed on to a third student, who wrote the climax. To supplement the element of dialogue, students worked daily on a recitation of Mark Antony’s oration at Caesar’s funeral, drawn from Shakespeare. At this time, the sixth grade has taken up the subject of Astronomy. Having focused earlier on the earth forces of Geology, they now turn their attention to the cold, clear constellations of autumn’s night sky.

The seventh grade students are also occupied with earth study, developing group reports for European Geography. The subjects are wide-ranging for each report, including biographies, current events, and artistic renderings of both physical and cultural geography. The block will close with a European “feast,” featuring food samples from many regions. In art, the students have explored perspective drawing, painting, and pastels over the autumn, and will now move into the careful copying of Renaissance portraits.

Eighth graders have finished their main lesson on the Civil War. As with the previous grade, they too developed group reports that included biographies of both an African-American and a spy, along with battlefield maps. Their current study is Solid Geometry, taught by Academe’s Sharon Annan. This subject combines the spatial thinking of geometric drawing with the linear thinking of algebra, and is something of a culmination of many years of Waldorf math. Additional subjects in math have included a study of the binary system, which is the language of computers, and an algebraic expression of the Pythagorean Theorem.

platonic solids

The students’ autumn efforts have yielded a bountiful harvest! This harvest, of course will become the seeds of future growth, and we look forward to what will unfold next.

~Jim McClurkin

6th Grade Teacher

jim mcclurkin

This article was originally printed in the December 2010 edition of the Garden Breeze newsletter of the Waldorf School of Atlanta.  

Advent in a Kindergarten Classroom at the Waldorf School of Atlanta

advent 4 weeks

As we move into Advent time, the classroom is cleared of the abundance of autumn to create an open space for life and goodness to come. There is a vine wreath on the table in the classroom with four candles. One is for each Sunday before Christmas. The first week of Advent honors the earth – the mineral world. The second week, we behold the plant world. Greenery and flowers are added to the wreath and classroom. The third week, we honor the animal world. During this week there are often conversations about some of the dear animal pets that live with the children.

The fourth week of Advent, we light a candle for humanity. In this dark time of year, we as human beings must let our inner light shine out to others. This is the verse we say as we light the candles:

The first light of Advent is the light of the stones,

That live in the seashells, crystals, and bones.

The second light of Advent is the light of the plants,

That reach up to the sun and in the breezes dance.

The third light of Advent is the light of the beasts;

The light of hope that we may see in the greatest and in the least.

The fourth light of Advent is the light of humankind

The light of love, the light of thought, to know and understand.

~Rudolf Steiner

~Annamay Keeney

Kindergarten Teacher

This article originally appeared in the December 2010 edition of the Garden Breeze newsletter of the Waldorf School of Atlanta.  

FAMILY RHYTHMS AND THE HOLIDAYS FROM WSA’S PARENT ENRICHMENT CLASS

Linden Tree Photography 2011 Advent Spiral 013

We are in the midst of the Holiday Season, with its joyful sharing, various festival celebrations of light, and special visits with treasured family and friends. It can also be a stressful time for families who are seeking to maintain a sense of regularity and familiar rhythms for their children, while also wanting to enjoy the change of pace that visiting with loved ones can bring.

Here are a few simple suggestions to add to or affirm your parenting wisdom at holiday time:

1. Just knowing and acknowledging that daily life may be different for a little while can be very helpful.

2. The most important rhythm, especially for our children under 7, would be the bedtime rhythm. While it may be later than usual, do include as much of the normal routines as possible; if traveling, do pack any familiar dolls/teddy bears, and books to support familiarity.

3. If your child still naps, do support a nap rhythm as much as possible.

4. While striving for regularity, do be flexible, and enjoy the change of pace that awaits you.

5. Notice, and attend to, stresses that may arise for yourself. Allow yourself a break, stepping outside, a ‘time out’ as needed. Just adding a few extra conscious breaths to your day can make all the difference.

6. Verbally preparing your child that things will be different can also go a long way in supporting their experience of the holiday season.

7. Do share, if possible, and if helpful, with family and friends, your routines that will support your child’s enjoyment of the holiday season. Including them in your plans of achieving a sense of regularity, may go a long way in friends and family supporting your efforts.

8. No matter how cold, do include outside time everyday or as much as possible, for you and your family; from walks in the neighborhood, to hikes in a favorite park, the invigorating cold winter air can renew everyone’s spirits; there is no wrong weather, only wrong clothing!

These are just a few ideas that can support a meaningful holiday season for all families.

~Sara Michelson,

Class Facilitator, Morning Garden Teacher

sleeping child at HF

This article was originally printed in the December 2010 edition of the Garden Breeze newsletter of the Waldorf School of Atlanta.